Can My Dog Eat That?

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Food item
Acorns
no

Acorns

Acorns contain gallotannins that are not safe for dogs if ingested. They can also cause abdominal obstruction, internal damage, kidney disease, and other stomach and digestive issues.
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Almond butter
maybe

Almond butter

Plain, unsweetened almond butter can be used as an occasional treat in small amounts, but it is tough on a dog’s digestive system. Avoid xylitol-containing almond butter, which is toxic to dogs.
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Almonds
yes

Almonds

Although they are not poisonous, almonds can be difficult for dogs to digest, since they often fail to chew them. However, if you do decide to feed your pup a couple almonds, be sure they are plain.
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Apples
yes

Apples

Fresh apple pieces are good for dogs in moderation. It’s best to cut an apple into bite-sized chunks and remove all of the toxic seeds and the tough core, which can pose a choking hazard.
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Applesauce
yes

Applesauce

Applesauce contains antioxidants, dietary fiber, and vitamins, but it also contains a lot of sugar, so it’s best to go with organic, sugar-free brands without preservatives and to limit their intake.
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Apricots
maybe

Apricots

Apricot stems, leaves, and pits contain cyanide, which is toxic. However, dogs can enjoy some of the flesh of the fruit on occasion, but keep it limited due to the high fiber content.
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Asparagus
maybe

Asparagus

Dogs can eat the part of the asparagus we eat, but not raw or whole asparagus because of digestive and choking hazards. And be sure dogs never eat asparagus from a garden due to poisonous seed pods!
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Avocado
maybe

Avocado

Avocados actually serve as a healthy fat for dogs and contribute to a lustrous, shiny coat. The pit, however, poses as a choking hazard, while the skin and leaves are poisonous to dogs.
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Bacon
yes

Bacon

It’s not an ideal snack, but bacon is safe for dogs in small amounts. It’s very high in salt and fat, however, which can lead to obesity and heart-related diseases. Keep this in the treat category.
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Banana peels
no

Banana peels

Banana peels aren’t toxic for dogs, but they are too fiber-rich and tough for them to digest. Dogs who happen to eat them often vomit in a few hours. Consult a vet if you’re concerned about your dog.
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Bananas
yes

Bananas

Not only are bananas tasty, but they are also an energy-boosting snack that’ll settle your pup’s stomach. Just make sure they don’t ingest the peel and, remember, good things come in small doses.
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Basil
yes

Basil

Basil is healthy for dogs in small amounts. It contains antioxidants, is anti-inflammatory, calms dogs, eases arthritis, and helps prevent cellular damage along with many illnesses.
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Beans
maybe

Beans

Some beans are a healthy source of protein and fiber when cooked, while others are not safe. Avoid fava, baked, refried, and canned beans when it comes to feeding your dog a small snack.
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Beer
no

Beer

Alcohol can be highly dangerous for dogs, and their livers are not meant to process alcohol, so do not let your dog get into beer or any other alcohol.
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Beets
yes

Beets

Beets are safe for dogs and contain vitamins and minerals that are good for their digestion and immune system as well as a healthy coat and skin.
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Bell peppers
maybe

Bell peppers

Bell peppers are healthy for dogs, but spicy red peppers are not recommended. Additionally, red chili peppers are not recommended, since they contain capsaicin, which irritates dogs.
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Black beans
yes

Black beans

Beans are a great source of vitamins, minerals, protein, and fiber in small portions. They help burn fat, regulate blood sugar, and strengthen a dog’s immune system.
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Blueberries
yes

Blueberries

In moderation, blueberries are a great treat to boost your dog’s overall health. Start off with a few berries a day, since too much fiber can cause loose stool.
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Bones
maybe

Bones

Cooked bones of any kind can be dangerous for dogs, since they can splinter and break. Raw bones are safer, specifically from cows and bison, rather than from small animals.
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Bread
maybe

Bread

In moderation, wheat bread is unlikely to harm dogs, but they may be sensitive or allergic to grains. It also has minimal nutritional benefits, so it’s best to keep it to a minimum.
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Broccoli
maybe

Broccoli

Broccoli isn’t the most ideal veggie for dogs, as it contains isothiocyanate, which can cause abdominal pain and digestive issues. In small quantities, broccoli is okay for dogs, but be mindful.
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Brussels sprouts
yes

Brussels sprouts

Brussels sprouts are rich in fiber and antioxidants, which is great for dogs in small portions. They’re also filled with vitamins that help improve their immune system and bone health.
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Butter
no

Butter

Butter is not good for dogs with lactose intolerance. It’s also mostly saturated fat and doesn’t have the health benefits that other fatty oils do. It may not be toxic, but it isn’t good for dogs.
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Butternut squash
yes

Butternut squash

So long as the squash is cooked and free of added sugar, salt, and fats, it’s okay to feed dogs small portions of this tasty veggie. In fact, this squash can actually improve your dog’s digestion.
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Cabbage
yes

Cabbage

Not only is cabbage safe for dogs, but it’s healthy too with lots of fiber and vitamins. But be mindful of the amount your dog eats, as it can cause gas and can suppress the function of the thyroid.
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Cantaloupe
yes

Cantaloupe

Fresh cantaloupe is great for your dog’s hydration and digestion in moderation due to the high fiber content. However, it is vital to remove the rind, as it is a major choking hazard.
Carrots
yes

Carrots

This healthy snack serves as a nutritious chew toy and improves dental health by cleaning the teeth and massaging the gums. Just be sure to serve them in small pieces.
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Cashews
maybe

Cashews

Cashews aren’t toxic to dogs, but your pet may be allergic to them. If not, cashews are a great occasional snack with high protein and fat, which is great for young dogs but harder on older ones.
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Cauliflower
yes

Cauliflower

Cauliflower is a good source of fiber, vitamins, and minerals. However, a large amount of cauliflower can cause gas and digestive issues.
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Celery
yes

Celery

Celery can actually help reduce canine obesity. Not only is it delightfully crunchy, but it’s chock full of vitamins that are great for your dog. It even freshens their breath!
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Cheerios
maybe

Cheerios

Cheerios won’t harm your dog when enjoyed in moderation, but they also won’t benefit from them either, since they don’t have a lot of nutritional value.
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Cheese
maybe

Cheese

Although cheese is not toxic for dogs, some dogs can actually be lactose intolerant. However, if your dog’s stomach is upset after ingesting cheese, you’ll be the first to know.
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Cherries
no

Cherries

Cherry flesh isn’t harmful to dogs, but the seeds and stems are choking hazards and are toxic to dogs. Their high sugar content also makes this fruit more of a special-occasion treat.
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Chicken
yes

Chicken

Chicken is a great source of protein, but it’s best served cooked due to the risk of salmonella with its raw form. However, a dog’s stomach acid is more acidic than that of humans, which helps kill bacteria.
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Chicken bones
maybe

Chicken bones

Cooked bones can splinter and cause internal damage to dogs. Dogs can enjoy chicken necks or larger bones, but should only eat chicken bones under close supervision.
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Chickpeas
yes

Chickpeas

Chickpeas are rich in fiber and a great source of protein as a snack for dogs. Avoid hummus and canned chickpeas though, since they contain harmful preservatives.
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Chocolate
no

Chocolate

Chocolate is poisonous to dogs, due to a compound it contains called theobromine, which turns into xanthine and can overload your pup’s central nervous system.
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Cilantro
yes

Cilantro

Cilantro is healthy for dogs, can help calm an upset stomach, and ease digestive issues when consumed in small portions. Too much cilantro, on the other hand, can actually cause digestive issues.
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Cinnamon
yes

Cinnamon

In small amounts, cinnamon is okay, but large amounts may irritate the mouth or stomach and can cause low blood sugar and liver disease. Avoid cinnamon-flavored foods, which can contain toxic nutmeg.
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Clementines
maybe

Clementines

Citrus fruits are not toxic to dogs, but a dog’s digestive system isn’t designed to process fruits. A small clementine without the peel should be fine, but keep it limited due to high sugar content.
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Coconut oil
yes

Coconut oil

Coconut oil contains healthy fats that fight infection, aid digestion, and improve a dog’s skin and coat! It also gives a boost of energy without a ton of calories in small doses.
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Coconut water
yes

Coconut water

Coconut water is full of electrolytes to keep dogs hydrated and give them a boost of energy with its vitamin and mineral content. Introduce a few ounces gradually to start.
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Corn
maybe

Corn

Plain, unsalted corn and corn kernels are safe for dogs, but monitor small dogs, since they can choke on kernels. And never let a dog eat corn off the cob, as it can cause intestinal obstruction.
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Corn cobs
no

Corn cobs

Although corn is fine for dogs, the cobs are another story. Corn cobs are a choking hazard and can cause intestinal obstruction if ingested.
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Cottage cheese
yes

Cottage cheese

Cottage cheese contains very little lactose, which is good for dogs that struggle with lactose intolerance. Rich in calcium and protein, it’s good for sensitive stomachs.
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Crab
yes

Crab

Cooked crab is a great source of protein, omega-3 fatty acids, and minerals for dogs! Raw crab may carry intestinal parasites, which is why it’s not recommended.
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Cranberries
yes

Cranberries

In small amounts, cranberries are healthy for dogs. Rich in antioxidants, they boost pet immune systems and decrease inflammation. Opt for unsweetened versions when it comes to treating your pup.
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Cucumber
maybe

Cucumber

In moderation, sliced cucumbers are a healthy snack for dogs, especially on a hot summer day. High in vitamin C, they can even be used as training treats.
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Dates
maybe

Dates

Dates are low-fat, cholesterol-free, and contain a lot of vitamins and minerals that are good for a dog’s health. Remove the pit and serve sparingly though, as they are high in sugar.
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Edamame
yes

Edamame

Not only is edamame safe, but it’s a healthy protein-rich snack, both cooked and raw, for dogs. However, it’s important that the edamame is free of salt and seasoning.
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Eggplant
maybe

Eggplant

Eggplant is safe for dogs, though they may have an allergy to it. Dogs with kidney issues or arthritis should avoid it though, as their conditions can worsen.
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Eggs
maybe

Eggs

Plain, cooked eggs are okay to feed your pup, but be mindful of how you season them, as onion and garlic are toxic to dogs. Raw eggs pose the risk of salmonella and other bacterial contamination.
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Figs
yes

Figs

Figs are a great source of dietary fiber and natural sugar. Start out slow to ensure your pup doesn’t have an allergic reaction, then limit them to two or three so they don't get too much fiber.
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Fish
yes

Fish

Fish is a great source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which are anti-inflammatory and improve cardiovascular and skin health. Just be sure it’s cooked, deboned, and free of marinades.
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Fries
maybe

Fries

Fries aren’t toxic to dogs, but their salt and fat content are of concern. While one or two fries won’t harm your dog, it’s not ideal to make this a habit. At the very least, order them without salt.
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Garlic
no

Garlic

Garlic is toxic to dogs. It’s a member of the plant Allium genus, which contains an organosulfur compound that can cause anemia in dogs if eaten in large quantities.
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Gatorade
maybe

Gatorade

Gatorade is not recommended for dogs, but a little bit won’t harm them. A few sips can be helpful after a bout of diarrhea, but the sugar and sodium outweigh the benefits.
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Ginger
yes

Ginger

Ginger is safe for dogs in small doses. It has antioxidants, is anti-inflammatory, and helps with GI problems and nausea to arthritis and blood circulation. Too much can actually cause nausea though.
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Grapes
no

Grapes

Dogs should never, ever eat grapes. They can cause acute kidney failure and sometimes even death, although the exact reason isn’t known. As a result, raisins are not recommended either.
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Green beans
yes

Green beans

Green beans are a great source of fiber, vitamins, and minerals. The magnesium helps dogs absorb nutrients better, vitamin A is great for their heart and eyes, and the list goes on!
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Green peppers
maybe

Green peppers

Green bell peppers are healthy for dogs and loaded with vitamins and antioxidants. But spicy green peppers are not recommended, since they contain capsaicin, which can cause irritation.
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Ham
maybe

Ham

Ham isn’t dangerous for dogs, but it’s so high in sodium and fat that it can be harmful in large quantities. They’ll surely love a few bites on occasion though, so be sure to remove the bones.
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Ham bones
maybe

Ham bones

Cooked bones are a no-no, given that they can splinter and break. Raw ham bones should only be consumed under close observation.
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Honey
yes

Honey

Since honey is a sweetener, it’s best to only feed your dog a little bit, between 1 teaspoon and 1 tablespoon a day. Raw honey is best and can even help with allergies!
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Honeydew melon
yes

Honeydew melon

Honeydew can help improve your dog’s digestive system, but it does have a high sugar content and should be enjoyed sparingly. Be sure to remove the rind and seeds!
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Hot dogs
maybe

Hot dogs

Hot dogs can be used as an occasional treat, but they’re not ideal for dogs due to being highly processed and high in sodium and additives. Only indulge your pup in a couple of plain bites.
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Ice cream
maybe

Ice cream

Ice cream isn’t an ideal treat for dogs, due to the lactose and sugar. If you must give your pup a couple licks, however, vanilla is the safest flavor. Keep it to a small portion once every now and then.
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Kale
yes

Kale

Kale is safe for dogs in small quantities. It has several vitamins and minerals that support their health. However, it is best to serve it cooked. Raw kale can upset their stomachs.
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Lemons
no

Lemons

First off, your dog won’t enjoy the sour taste, but lemons also contain psoralen compounds and aromatic oils that are toxic to dogs and can cause an upset stomach.
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Lentils
yes

Lentils

Lentils are a great source of iron, fiber, and protein for dogs. They are best enjoyed plain, cooked, and in small portions.
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Lettuce
yes

Lettuce

Romaine, iceberg, and green leaf lettuces are safe for dogs, and they have great nutritional benefits. As always though, moderation is key. Excess lettuce can cause digestive issues.
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Limes
no

Limes

First off, your dog won’t enjoy the sour taste, but limes are also toxic to dogs. Contact with the leaves, peel, or fruit can cause illness.
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Mandarin oranges
yes

Mandarin oranges

Although dogs can eat oranges, their digestive systems aren’t designed for them, so it’s best to limit their intake. However, if you do feed them a couple segments, be sure to remove the peel and seeds.
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Mango
yes

Mango

Rich in antioxidants and vitamins, mangoes are a great treat for dogs in moderation. They can even help improve your dog’s health! Always peel and remove the pit before serving.
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Marshmallows
yes

Marshmallows

Technically dogs can eat marshmallows, but we advise against it, as they are basically sugar pillows. They can be helpful for disguising medication, but that’s about it.
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Melon
yes

Melon

Melon has several benefits for dogs with its vitamin, potassium, and dietary fiber content. It’s high in sugar though, so keep it to a minimum, and remove the seeds and rind.
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Milk
maybe

Milk

If your dog isn’t lactose intolerant, milk should still be served sparingly, as dogs don’t process dairy in the same way we do. Reduced-fat milk without added sugar is your best bet for a milky treat.
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Mint
maybe

Mint

Most varieties of mint are safe for dogs, if they eat a few leaves here and there. English pennyroyal mint, however, is toxic to dogs.
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Mushrooms
maybe

Mushrooms

Dogs should never eat mushrooms found in the wild, since they can cause damage to a dog’s digestive system. Store-bought mushrooms, however, may be okay in small quantities.
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Mustard
no

Mustard

Mustard contains toxic compounds that can inflame the stomach and the intestinal tract or lead to gastroenteritis. If they get a small lick, they’ll be okay, but large amounts are not safe.
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Nectarines
yes

Nectarines

Nectarines are a good source of vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber, which are great for a dog’s digestive system. Make sure the pit is removed and serve in moderation due to the sugar content.
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Nuts
maybe

Nuts

Macadamia nuts, walnuts, and pecans are toxic to dogs, as they can become moldy and cause issues. Almonds and pine nuts, however, are generally okay for dogs, but be mindful of their consumption.
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Oatmeal
yes

Oatmeal

Oats are a great source of fiber and protein for dogs, which helps with digestion. They also contain vitamins, and are excellent for dogs with wheat allergies.
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Okra
yes

Okra

High in vitamins and minerals, okra is safe for dogs and helps prevent cancer and regulate blood sugar. As always, it is ideal in small amounts when cooked, but can be used as a chew toy when raw.
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Olives
maybe

Olives

Olives are not toxic to dogs, but they are high in salt and fat, which isn’t ideal. High-fat diets put pups at risk of pancreatitis, which affects their ability to digest food and nutrients.
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Onions
no

Onions

Onions are toxic to dogs. As a member of the plant Allium genus, onions have an organosulfur compound that can cause anemia in dogs if they eat onions often or in large quantities.
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Orange peels
no

Orange peels

Orange peels aren’t toxic to dogs, but they are tough to digest. So if you decide to give your dog some orange pieces, make sure to remove the peel first.
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Oranges
yes

Oranges

Although dogs can eat oranges, their digestive systems aren’t designed for them, so it’s best to limit their intake. However, if you do feed them a couple segments, be sure to remove the seeds.
Pancakes
maybe

Pancakes

A small amount of plain pancakes is okay for dogs, unless they have a wheat allergy. But dogs should not be served pancakes with the sweet toppings we love to enjoy.
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Papaya
yes

Papaya

This tasty fruit is high in fiber, healthy enzymes, vitamins, and minerals, which aid heart and immune system health. Make sure your dog doesn’t get any seeds though, as they contain cyanide.
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Pasta
maybe

Pasta

In cooked, plain form pasta is unlikely to harm your pet, so you can feed some to your dog in moderation. However, your pet may be allergic or sensitive to grains, so be mindful.
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Peaches
yes

Peaches

Peaches are a great source of vitamins, minerals, and fiber for dogs. However, they are also high in sugar, so limit your pup’s intake. As always, be sure to remove the pit!
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Peanut butter
yes

Peanut butter

We all know dogs love peanut butter! It’s packed with protein, healthy fats, niacin, and vitamins. Just make sure it’s unsalted and free of artificial sweeteners that can be harmful.
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Peanuts
yes

Peanuts

As long as they are not in the shell, unsweetened, unsalted, and unseasoned, peanuts are perfectly fine for dog consumption. But remember, moderation is key.
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Pears
yes

Pears

Pears are perfectly healthy for dogs, and they just so happen to love the sweet taste! Due to the high sugar content, it’s best to make this delicious fruit a treat, rather than a common snack.
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Peas
yes

Peas

Peas are a healthy treat for dogs with their high vitamin and mineral content. They are not recommended for dogs with kidney issues though, due to their purine content, which can aggravate kidneys.
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Pecans
no

Pecans

Pecans aren’t safe for dogs, since they can become moldy, which can cause seizures and neurological issues. In addition, nuts can cause intestinal obstruction.
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Pepperoni
maybe

Pepperoni

Pepperoni is not recommended given its high salt and fat content, along with seasonings that may be harmful. If they consume a lot of it, dogs are at risk for digestive issues to pancreatitis.
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Peppers
maybe

Peppers

When it comes to bell peppers, it’s just fine for your dog to consume a few. Spicy peppers, on the other hand, are not recommended, since they contain capsaicin, which causes irritation.
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Pickles
yes

Pickles

Dogs can eat pickles, but they are high in sodium so it’s best to use them as a treat. They’re not high in nutrients, but they do have small amounts of vitamin A, K, iron, calcium, and magnesium.
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Pineapple
yes

Pineapple

Pineapples are high in vitamins and minerals that help boost your dog’s digestive and immune systems. Be sure to serve fresh pineapple and stick with small chunks once a week.
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Pistachios
maybe

Pistachios

Pistachios aren’t toxic to dogs, but nuts aren’t recommended due to high fat content and potential for a mold that puts dogs at risk of liver damage. The shells are also a choking hazard.
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Pizza
maybe

Pizza

If you have plain pizza dough and a dog with no wheat allergies, they can probably have a bite. But beware that most pizzas have onion and garlic in the crust or sauce, which are toxic to dogs.
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Plantains
yes

Plantains

Plantains are safe for dogs, but only when cooked and in small quantities. They are very high in fiber, so they will upset your dog’s stomach in large amounts.
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Plums
maybe

Plums

If your dog has a few slices of plum, they’ll be just fine, but plums are not ideal for dogs due to their sugar content. In addition, the pit is a choking hazard and contains cyanide.
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Pomegranate
maybe

Pomegranate

Pomegranates are not toxic to dogs and have a lot of health benefits, but a large amount of raw pomegranate can upset a dog's stomach due to the tannins. A couple arils are great for a treat though.
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Popcorn
maybe

Popcorn

Plain, air-popped, unsalted, unbuttered popcorn is okay for dogs, but who eats popcorn like that? The high levels of fat and sodium in the popcorn we like can lead to dehydration and obesity.
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Pork
maybe

Pork

Pork must be thoroughly cooked before it’s an option for dogs, and while it’s high in protein, it’s a rich meat that can cause indigestion. Avoid giving your dog pork seasoned with onion or garlic.
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Potatoes
yes

Potatoes

Dogs can eat potatoes when they are cooked. In raw form, however, they contain solanine, which can be dangerous for dogs. It’s also best to keep them away from potato skins and plants.
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Pretzels
yes

Pretzels

Unsalted pretzels are just fine for dogs in small portions, so long as your pup doesn’t have a wheat allergy. Plain is best since high-salt foods aren’t ideal for dogs.
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Pumpkin pie
maybe

Pumpkin pie

Although pumpkin has a lot of nutritional benefits, pumpkin pie is loaded with sugar, which is not good for dogs. It’s not toxic, though, if your pup happens to get into some.
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Quinoa
maybe

Quinoa

Quinoa has many health benefits, but it also contains oxalates, which can cause digestive problems and inflammation. Be sure it’s rinsed, cooked, and plain if you do give your pup a small serving.
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Radishes
yes

Radishes

Radishes are safe in moderation and offer fiber, potassium, and vitamin C. These will keep your dog’s muscles healthy and support your dog’s digestion and immune system.
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Raisins
no

Raisins

Dogs should never, ever eat grapes, which means no raisins either. Fresh or dried, they can cause acute kidney failure and sometimes even death, although the exact reason isn’t known.
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Raspberries
yes

Raspberries

Raspberries are okay for dogs in moderation, but there are some risks if they eat large quantities. Keep servings to less than a cup due to their xylitol content, which can cause hypoglycemia.
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Raw chicken
maybe

Raw chicken

With raw chicken, you run the risk of salmonella and other bacterial contamination. However, a dog’s stomach acid is more acidic than ours, which helps them fend off bacteria better than we can.
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Raw eggs
maybe

Raw eggs

While dogs can technically eat raw eggs, they do run the risk of getting salmonella as a result, and raw eggs are not any more nutritious than cooked eggs. Plain, cooked eggs are your best bet.
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Raw meat
maybe

Raw meat

Beef is a great source of protein, but salmonella and other bacterial contamination are risks with raw beef. It's not recommended for puppies, dogs with liver or kidney failure, or dogs with cancer.
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Red peppers
maybe

Red peppers

Red bell peppers are healthy for dogs and contain high levels of vitamins and antioxidants. Spicy red peppers are not recommended though, due to their capsaicin content, which can cause irritation.
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Rib bones
maybe

Rib bones

Cooked bones can splinter and cause internal damage to dogs. Dogs can chew on rib bones from pork or beef under close observation, along with raw bones. But raw bones pose some risks too.
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Rice cereal
yes

Rice cereal

Rice-based cereal is safe for dogs, but not as a meal replacement. A small amount of dry cereal is okay as a snack, but it doesn’t provide much in regards to nutritional benefits.
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Salami
maybe

Salami

Salami is not toxic to dogs, but it’s not ideal for them due to its high sodium and fat. You also need to be cautious of what seasonings are included, as some are toxic to dogs.
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Salmon
yes

Salmon

When it is fully cooked, salmon is great for dogs with its high protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which boost the immune system. It helps maintain a healthy coat and improves brain and joint health.
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Sausage
maybe

Sausage

Sausage is not recommended, due to high salt and fat content. It’s also good to be cautious of what sausage is seasoned with, given that onion and garlic are toxic to dogs.
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Scrambled eggs
maybe

Scrambled eggs

Scrambled eggs won’t harm your dog, but you need to be mindful of how they were cooked. Since they can’t have certain seasonings, it’s best for dogs to only enjoy bites of plain scrambled eggs.
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Seaweed
maybe

Seaweed

Unseasoned seaweed is fine for dogs on occasion, but avoid the kelp that grows along the coast because of pollutants. Seaweed from the beach is also a no-no due to pollutants and salt.
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Shrimp
yes

Shrimp

Cooked shrimp with the shells removed is an excellent source of protein for dogs. Be mindful of serving them this snack in moderation. (Shrimp can be a great training treat too!)
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Spaghetti
maybe

Spaghetti

In cooked, plain form, spaghetti noodles are unlikely to harm your pet, so you can feed some to your dog in moderation. However, your pet may be allergic or sensitive to grains, so be mindful.
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Spicy food
maybe

Spicy food

Spicy foods won’t harm your dog, but they won’t be enjoyable for them either. Their taste buds are different from ours, so spice will affect them differently too. It’s best to keep this away.
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Spinach
yes

Spinach

This leafy green helps boost the immune system, energy levels, vitality, and the heart while helping to prevent cancer. Blandly cooked spinach served sparingly is best for dogs.
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Steak
yes

Steak

Beef is a good source of protein and fatty acids for dogs, which help tone muscles and develop healthy skin, hair, and joints. Make sure it’s bone-free and cooked medium well.
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Strawberries
yes

Strawberries

High in antioxidants and vitamin C, strawberries are actually good for dogs! However, it is important to feed them fresh or unsweetened frozen strawberries in moderation.
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Sugar
maybe

Sugar

Natural sugar from fruit is fine, but granulated sugar is not healthy for dogs. It isn’t toxic for them, but it does put them at risk of obesity, teeth problems, and diabetes.
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Sweet potatoes
yes

Sweet potatoes

Sweet potatoes are a superfood for dogs that can help promote digestive health, serve as a powerful antioxidant, and help combat obesity.
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Tangerines
yes

Tangerines

In limited amounts, tangerines are good for dogs due to their high vitamin content. They are also high in sugar though, so serve sparingly.
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Tofu
maybe

Tofu

Tofu is not toxic, but soy is an incomplete protein for pups, which can cause bloating and gas. Dogs can be allergic to soy as well, so proceed with caution.
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Tomatoes
maybe

Tomatoes

Tomato flesh won’t hurt your dog, but be sure they don’t get a hold of any leaves, stems, or unripe tomatoes because they contain solanine, which is dangerous for dogs to ingest.
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Tortillas
maybe

Tortillas

Plain flour tortillas should be okay in moderation as long as your pup doesn’t have a wheat allergy or sensitivity to grains. With minimal nutritional value, these are best as an occasional snack.
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Tuna
yes

Tuna

Rich in lean protein and omega-3s, tuna can improve cardiovascular and skin health. It also contains vitamins and minerals that are healthy for pups when served sparingly.
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Turkey
yes

Turkey

Cooked turkey is a great source of protein for dogs! Turkey bones are not good for them though, as raw bones carry a risk of salmonella, and they can splinter and cause internal damage.
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Turkey bones
maybe

Turkey bones

Dogs can enjoy turkey necks or large bones. Cooked bones can splinter and cause internal damage to dogs, while raw bones pose some risks and should only be consumed under observation.
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Vanilla ice cream
maybe

Vanilla ice cream

Ice cream isn’t really dog-friendly, due to the lactose and sugar, but vanilla ice cream is the safest flavor. If you’re going to indulge your dog, make it a small amount once in a blue moon.
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Vegetables
maybe

Vegetables

Certain veggies are great for dogs in small portions while others should be avoided. In general, though, vegetables are ideal as an occasional dog snack. Be mindful of sugar and fiber content.
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Walnuts
no

Walnuts

Walnuts aren’t safe for dogs, since they can become moldy, which can cause seizures and neurological issues. In addition, nuts can cause intestinal obstruction.
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Watermelon
maybe

Watermelon

While it is more than okay for your pup to have a few bites of watermelon (without seeds), the rind presents a problem. The texture and toughness of it can cause blockage, so be sure to toss it.
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Watermelon rind
maybe

Watermelon rind

Watermelon rinds aren’t toxic, but the texture and toughness of them is problematic. It’s best for dogs just to have a couple bites of watermelon flesh without seeds, and to toss the rind.
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White chocolate
no

White chocolate

Chocolate is fatally toxic to dogs, even in small portions. Dogs cannot metabolize theobromine, which is in chocolate, so it can build to toxic levels in their system, causing harm.
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Yogurt
yes

Yogurt

Unless your dog is lactose intolerant, yogurt (specifically plain Greek) is good for dogs with its high levels of probiotics. Just be sure to avoid flavored or sweetened versions.
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Zucchini
yes

Zucchini

In moderation, zucchini is great for dogs! It’s filled with vitamins and minerals that help with their muscles, nerves, vision, and immune system. In large amounts, it may make pups gassy, so beware!
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homemade dog food

Homemade Dog Food

We've all been there: you get home from work, and as your dog is starting expectingly at you, you realize you forgot to grab a new bag of dog food at the store. Now that you're armed with this database of human foods, you can make homemade dog food in a pinch. Read more about what to feed your dog when you're out of dog food.

poisonous plants to dogs

Poisonous Plants to Dogs

From your sock drawer to the garden—it's inevitable that dogs will get into things around the house. It's helpful to know which plants are poisonous to dogs, so that you can be prepared to respond if you find them eating one. Check out our database of over 150 poisonous plants.

 

 

 

 

 

*Survey of 1,200 US pet parents by Rover.com via Pollfish in June 2020.

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