1

Security cameras in the clients home--would you be comfortable?

asked 2015-08-18 19:56:59 -0500

I just had a meet and greet with a new client. It went fairly well, I told them I would be happy to watch their dogs, and at the very end of our half hour meet and greet they told me they have cameras in their home. I immediately felt my face turn pink, and my only response was "where?" They pointed in a few directions, but I could only see one out in the open. The dogs seemed great, the people were nice, and they do have a very nice home. I would never do anything irresponsible in a clients home and would never disrespect their home, dogs or property, but something about knowing cameras were going to be on me and the fact that I didn't know where they were made me uneasy. I already told the family I would sit for them, but haven't accepted the stay yet. What would you do in this situation?

edit edit tags flag offensive close merge delete

Comments

I always ask if my clients have cameras in their home and where they are. As you said I would never disrespect their property, but I feel much more comfortable knowing. You can even see it as a good thing, because they will see what a great job you are doing taking care of their home and pets!

Maegen G.'s profile image Maegen G.  ( 2015-08-26 18:46:28 -0500 ) edit

I thinks it's something to get used to, the way of the fututre

Suzanne E.'s profile image Suzanne E.  ( 2015-11-17 09:45:26 -0500 ) edit

I just started a House sitting job and the owners originally said the alarm didn't work or wasn't attached to anything. After walking in I found myself with a camera in my face and in the living room. I'm creeper out by the lying.

Chelsea L.'s profile image Chelsea L.  ( 2017-07-22 23:31:50 -0500 ) edit

You get used it it. At first cameras really bothered me. My biz is based on trust. If I wanted a job as a film actress I would pursue that instead! Rover's contract makes it legal for folks to use cameras. If someone uses cameras to micromanage/hurt you however, speak up.

Anna W.'s profile image Anna W.  ( 2017-09-15 17:03:50 -0500 ) edit

I thought by law they have to reveal if they have cameras. ? Perhaps I'm wrong? They cannot pop up later and say oh, by the way, I saw on camera you took my dog out at 10 instead of 9 as I requested. /??????

Carol D.'s profile image Carol D.  ( 2018-11-09 02:30:01 -0500 ) edit

18 Answers

Sort by ยป oldest newest most voted
1 2 next »
9
answered 2015-08-18 20:08:07 -0500

I teach school and every move is tracked by security cameras to ensure the safety of my students and myself. Since I am confident my behavior is always appropriate, I made the conscious decision not to care.

We all need to assume that, at any given moment, we are all on camera..... somewhere. Of course this leads to lengthy moral and ethical discussions, but that's not what I'm aiming for. It's just a fact of life in the 21st century.

I would be grateful they informed me, and would accept the stay.

edit flag offensive delete link more

Comments

Thank you for your feedback, Carmen. You are right, there are cameras everywhere...I just hadn't thought about it that way.

Alyssa B.'s profile image Alyssa B.  ( 2015-08-19 15:25:42 -0500 ) edit

Sure, we should all expect that we're on camera a lot of times..in PUBLIC. There is a fine line between cameras in a school or shopping mall, and in the privacy of someone's home. None of us would be okay w/ hotel rooms having cameras in them right? Same idea & same problem with house sitting IMO.

Nina O.'s profile image Nina O.  ( 2016-07-28 14:52:58 -0500 ) edit
4
answered 2015-08-22 16:28:48 -0500

In this day and age I just assume every client has a nanny cam whether they do or not. I have no issue with this since my actions are the same regardless. As a potential client, I'd be concerned about any service provider who appears defensive or goes overboard asking about cameras. There are so many service people who have access to people's homes. I think it's a safe practice.

edit flag offensive delete link more
1
answered 2015-08-19 15:29:49 -0500

In the case of having a client who has cameras in their home I would be a good idea to discuss your process to assure them and ensure when/if they are viewing the tapes. Make sure to know there is the dog food, how to fill water bowls if you are allowed to use the restroom or TV and any other thing you might need to know to avoid doing something they might not like. Its also good to avoid looking through cabinets. Also, unless discussed or offered my customer it is safe to assume that your visit should me limited to letting the dog out/walking the pet and feeding them.

edit flag offensive delete link more
1
answered 2015-08-26 22:01:59 -0500

Yes, I have at last a couple clients that have cameras in their home. It was never an issue for me. In both cases, they got them so they could see their dog in real time while they were away. It's worth mentioning these cameras are visibly mounted to film only the kitchen/living room areas, where the dogs spend most of their awake time. One client rarely watches it and I generally only walk that dog, so I'm not spending much time there anyway.

The other client travels a lot and it gives her peace of mind to see her dogs doing well whenever she can, which is great, because she misses her dogs way more than any pet parent I've ever met. It also allows her to monitor the comings/goings in the home with extended family members (especially if unannounced visits), their friends, and other service providers. The placement of cameras actually eliminated a lot of questions previously asked. Since I provide multiple walks/day, she encourages me to spend as much time as I want in between walks in her home when my availability allows. During some of the times I've been there, she's messaged me to make myself more comfortable or some nice comment about the interaction with the dogs and I. It's actually been a positive enhancement tool in our communications.

I always figure I could be seen by someone at any time, so I behave professionally and dress conservatively (including nightwear that I wouldn't be embarrassed seen wearing on camera or even on the street if there was an emergency).

edit flag offensive delete link more
1
answered 2015-08-19 18:37:19 -0500

I haven't had this situation yet, but I can certainly understand your hesitance to accept the stay. I see that you've already accepted it, though, so I wish you luck and peace. :-)

That being said, in the future if that situation came up at the M&G, I would ask the client how often they access the camera feed info and what exactly they are using them for. If they use it to check up on me frequently during the day/night, then I would be hesitant to accept. If it's just used as backup in case of a burglary or other incident, and they don't look at the footage that often, then I would go with my instincts as if they weren't there.

edit flag offensive delete link more
1
answered 2015-08-19 01:57:16 -0500

My first client simply told me that he 'had cameras', without specifying where. So at the end of the Meet & Greet, I asked him. I didn't want to make him suspicious or something, so I just told him that I've never stayed in a person's house before that had cameras in it (which is true) and that knowing where they are would just help to ease my nerves a bit. I don't have a problem with there being in-house cameras, but it is useful information to know, as others said, such as with pajamas and whatnot. Don't want anyone to see parts of me that I don't want them to see, ha! He specified where the cameras were and that was that. Booked and completed the stay, everything went swimmingly. I didn't have any bad gut feelings and he wasn't off-putting in the least.

edit flag offensive delete link more

Comments

Thank you for your help! It was just the first experience I have had with this, and it made me feel a little nervous. I did book the stay, and hopefully it will go just as well as it did for you! Then I can lay my anxiety to rest :)

Alyssa B.'s profile image Alyssa B.  ( 2015-08-19 15:42:13 -0500 ) edit
1
answered 2015-08-18 20:35:22 -0500

Every one has a different opinion on this subject. I personally don't like the idea of camera's watching me everywhere. Not because I'm worried about my behavior, but because when I'm doing an overnight in someone's home I will obviously be in my pajama's and sometimes playing in those pj's with the dogs and would be very embarrassed if anything slipped out as I am a very voluptuous woman. lol Personally, I would prefer NOT to know if they have camera's. That way I don't have any anxiety than I already do have sleeping in a strange place. I usually don't ask and I've had a pet sit job before where the client told me about their camera that was located just outside the front door due to packages being stolen in the neighborhood which I completely understood as that issue was happening with us too where we lived.

As far as whether to accept the job or not after knowing all of this, it would be on a case by case basis. Sometimes it isn't a big deal, but other times I've heard sitter's having client's with camera's using them to micromanage them and calling them constantly about every little minute thing and this was from a professional sitter NOT on Rover. So, go with your instinct when you interview those people. If anything is "off" about them then I would just say I don't think this is the right fit, but if you have a good feeling about the owners and they seem pretty normal then I would try perhaps a trial pet sit to ease any concerns.

edit flag offensive delete link more

Comments

Thank you for your help. It is great to hear both sides of the story and to know that you have heard of this before. It is anxiety inducing for me as well, but I accepted the stay and hopefully it won't make a difference in the end.

Alyssa B.'s profile image Alyssa B.  ( 2015-08-19 15:28:00 -0500 ) edit

I was hoping to find a comment about someone worrying about being seen in their pjs! So far you have been the only one! I am like that is what I am more nervous about! I am a very hot sleeper so I barely sleep in anything (of course at client homes I cover up more) but I am nervous about that as wel

Julia N.'s profile image Julia N.  ( 2019-07-03 11:06:22 -0500 ) edit
0
answered 2017-03-21 09:41:54 -0500

I prefer that clients have cameras when I do drop-ins or walking visits. I do what I am supposed to do and I don't mind to be filmed. If anything ever happened, there is a proof that I am doing my work and not something else. One client told me that the sitter before me had robbed them and stolen some valuable things. I was relieved to hear that they got security cameras because I did not want to be liable if they couldn't find anything.

edit flag offensive delete link more
0
answered 2015-08-20 17:01:47 -0500

I have had a client with cameras, I said no problem cause I am an honest person and would never harm any animals but I have to admit it did freak me out a few times. My cell phone did not work very well and needed to check in with my mom at the time she had cancer. I asked the clients if I could use the house phone they said fine. I did not put it on the charger right away and they called to say please put it back on the charger. So they were watching my every move. I really don't like the idea of folks seeing me sleep either. But the stay went fine and if there was anything they needed to know they could look at the cameras. I understand about being in your PJs lol.

edit flag offensive delete link more

Comments

Whoa! Talk about Big Brother! It's one thing to review recordings after the fact, but to be watching someone in real time and letting them know is way too much even for an honest person. No thank you.

Karen R.'s profile image Karen R.  ( 2015-08-21 14:52:22 -0500 ) edit
0
answered 2015-11-15 09:45:34 -0500

I know this is an older post but wanted to add something. When you are in any store shopping there are security cameras "watching" And when you are walking dogs in the neighborhood a Lot of homes now have outdoor security cameras that also show the street view. "Big Brother Is Watching!" A lot of times neighbors watch the "neighboring homes" very closely, especially if it has a Neighborhood Watch. You just need to believe and get comfortable with the fact that you are "on camera" and being "observed" no matter where you are at all times. Kathleen D.

edit flag offensive delete link more
1 2 next »

Your Answer

Please start posting anonymously - your entry will be published after you log in or create a new account. This space is reserved only for answers. If you would like to engage in a discussion, please instead post a comment under the question or an answer that you would like to discuss

Add Answer