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Is it safe to do a spend the night meet and greet at the clients home?

asked 2014-12-07 12:02:41 -0500

I just had a client ask if I could spend the night at their house for a meet and greet to see if I am a good fit. Is it safe to do this?

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No, absolutely not! If it was nice old lady that was just worried about her pets, you could consider it. However, you would have to be paid and covered by Rover Insurance. It is a very odd request. If there is anything that makes you uncomfortable don't do it.

Laura F.'s profile imageLaura F. ( 2014-12-16 20:56:13 -0500 )edit

If it were me, I wouldn't even book with them. This sounds sketchy. *Shudder*

Sara R.'s profile imageSara R. ( 2016-11-28 09:19:48 -0500 )edit

10 Answers

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answered 2014-12-07 13:14:22 -0500

Personally I wouldn't do it. I'm seeing red flags. But maybe they're just clueless to how the system works and need you, the professional, to walk them through the steps. When we do meet and greets, I have the potential clients come by our house, but I meet them out at the street. Then we take the dogs for a short walk to get acquainted, and if the dogs are getting along well, there's a field at the end of the block where we can give them a little more freedom to play. THEN, I will invite the potential clients to come inside and see where their dog would be staying.

If I were in your position, I would request to meet somewhere safe and public first, like a park or coffee shop so that you can chat with the clients and (if possible) meet the animals. After getting to know them a bit, I'd be more comfortable visiting at their house, but only with a clear time limit. Still, make sure someone knows where you went and who you are with, and maybe have a friend drive you to the meet and greet and wait in the car.

I'm not sure from your question, but it sounds like they're wanting you to stay there while they are home, and quite possibly without compensation? That's not something I would go for. You're a professional and your time is valuable. I'd encourage them to ask you any and all questions they'd like about the type of care you provide during the confines of the meet and greet, and to message you if they have any further concerns, but staying overnight is a service you charge for. And of course, at the first sign of anything creepy, excuse yourself and report the encounter to Rover.

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Yea it just seems sketchy to me. I am the pet sitter and she wants to do a meet and greet for me to go to her house (the client) and spend the night with her 2 dogs. I would stay there all night and not get paid for it. It just doesn't seem right for the client to ask me the pet sitter to stay at their house to see if I am a good fit to watch her dogs.

Maranda W.'s profile imageMaranda W. ( 2014-12-07 17:04:53 -0500 )edit

Do you normally sit in your home or in the client's? Either way, it's not appropriate for them to ask you to work for free. I understand being concerned about leaving the dogs with someone new, but if they won't be put at ease by anything less than you working for free, I'd politely decline.

Laura R.'s profile imageLaura R. ( 2014-12-08 10:44:14 -0500 )edit
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answered 2014-12-16 11:04:50 -0500

If the stay is going to take place in your home, it makes no sense to stay overnight in theirs. If you're a traveling sitter, then the answer is, "There's no free lunch!". I just had a one night test stay in my home, and of course it was booked and paid for. There are some sitter services that even have a fee for the meet and greet (which I think is ridiculous, since to me it's a requirement and only takes an hour). Bottom line, I wouldn't even consider it, and just the fact that these people have made you feel even a modicum of discomfort in your dealings with them also makes me think you should go with your gut and steer clear. One extra client isn't worth it ... better safe than sorry!

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answered 2014-12-16 17:09:21 -0500

No, and oh no no no.

Does Rover have a "flag" system in place to protect us from bad clients like this? Meet & Greets really should only be at most an hour. That is plenty of time to meet the dog, feel out the client and surroundings, be shown the dog's items (food, bed, treats), and exchange keys if you are visiting their home for dog care. The shorter the sweeter in my opinion.

Meeting a stranger from online, Use a check-in system for safety. There are tracking apps that monitor your smartphone location, but I prefer calling a friend and giving them the address I will be meeting the stranger at. They know that if I do not call them (no text) at by a certain time (usually 2hrs) then they need to notify authorities.

It may seem extreme, but these are strangers from the internet and some are weirdos!

Good luck and be safe!

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Hi Lenell, You can always call Rover's Trust & Safety team if you have any concerns at 888-453-7889. Jessica

Jessica M.'s profile imageJessica M. ( 2014-12-16 17:12:13 -0500 )edit

If I feel uncomfortable I bring my husband. If it's a man requesting a booking I bring my husband. Or I'll let him know the exact address where I'm at I'll let him know when I get there and I'll let him know when I leave

Manon P.'s profile imageManon P. ( 2016-05-24 15:38:07 -0500 )edit
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answered 2014-12-08 15:42:40 -0500

Hi Maranda,

I would encourage you to do whatever you feel comfortable with. It's definitely up to you. As a Rover sitter, I would probably do a visit or Meet & Greet during the day. If you wanted to do an overnight or prolonged trial run, I would book through Rover so it's covered by insurance.

As always, please feel free to reach out to the Rover customer experience team at 888-453-7889 with any questions.

Thanks, Jessica

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answered 2016-04-15 18:01:50 -0500

I would let them know that they are welcome to do a one night stay to test it out for a future longer stay, but that it still needs to be booked and paid for through Rover. I'm not a traveling sitter, but this is what I've done in the past for clients wanting to do a one night test with their dog at my house and no one has ever been upset about my suggesting that.

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answered 2016-04-14 14:35:09 -0500

"Meet & Greets really should only be at most an hour. That is plenty of time to meet the dog, feel out the client and surroundings, be shown the dog's items (food, bed, treats), and exchange keys if you are visiting their home for dog care. The shorter the sweeter in my opinion." --> Totally agree!!

I doubt Rover insurance covers this, and anyway, it's completely excessive. What could they need to know by you sleeping in their home that they can't tell from meeting you and interacting while you're awake? Really sketchy.

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answered 2014-12-17 15:47:53 -0500

No Way...... This job depends so much on common sense, go with the gut, use your head, does it feel right?

Do Not put yourself in Harms way, I have already had too , way TOO many whackadoodles contacting me with "red Flag" requests... Follow your heart, follow your instincts, If your have doubts.... do WITH-OUT! Politely say, let me check my calendar, and follow up after with," I am unavailable at that time, I am sorry"....... Done!

Good Luck!

:) s

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answered 2016-11-18 23:16:57 -0500

I have met owners at their home for a meet and greet maybe 15-30 minutes---but I wouldn't stay over. Seems shady--are they paying for that night? I don't offer house sitting as i have my own dog to care for, but to me its significant comfort inconvenience either way so I wouldn't see why anyone would do it for free--as a typical meet and greet is.

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answered 2016-11-17 22:37:52 -0500

Not only no But Heck No! Ugh talk about nerve. Dang, some people!

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answered 2016-04-14 21:01:24 -0500

I think the client is looking for a free night of dog sitting.

Nope.

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I put it out there straight up at the meet-and-greet I do not do overnights unless it's absolutely necessary because it is a dog is sick so forth and so on

Manon P.'s profile imageManon P. ( 2016-05-24 15:39:56 -0500 )edit

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