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Is my dog marking his territory?

asked 2017-07-14 23:20:27 -0600

I'm trying to figure out what is going on. I believe my dog is trying to mark her territory.

We let our friend move in with us. He has two small dogs who aren't very well potty trained and do not get along with our dog so he keeps them in his room and lets them outside after returning from work.

All 3 dogs do go outside, and the back room floor where they are let out is being peed on.

My dog does not pee anywhere else in the house. I have laminate flooring and mop with my own mop everyday. Our friend uses his ownmop to clean up his dogs urine. He does not bend down and soak the urine in a towel first. The urine is cleaned only with a mop.

I'm wondering if my dog is only marking where he has cleaned with the same mop he uses to clean up his dogs urine? I'm grossed out. To me it's not sanitary to use the same mop over and over again to clean urine.

My dog is trained to go outside, is she marking her territory because of this? I don't know how else to explain to our friend to stop using this mop. MY FLOORS ARE BEING RUINED!

The mop has his dogs urine scent on it, so to me it makes sense my dog would mark her territory where it's being used. And even if we can't smell the urine a dogs scent is so much stronger than ours.

I need ground to stand on to back up my theory.

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answered 2017-07-18 00:13:35 -0600

It could be a number of things. Marking territory? Perhaps. Simply peeing due to still being able to smell it is another possibility. It could also be caused by general anxiety when passing through that area. I'd make sure to get an enzymatic cleaner like Nature's Miracle or a water/vinegar mix. Regular soap and cleaner does not cut through the smell - dogs will still smell it and continue to go in the same spot.

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Natures Miracle is the best!

Tori C.'s profile image Tori C.  ( 2017-07-21 20:23:31 -0600 ) edit
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answered 2017-07-23 09:03:10 -0600

Dogs will pee where other dogs have peed, plain and simple. It is about territory but also that the area now smells like a toilet to their very sensitive nose and dogs being creatures of habits, they like to do their business in the same place.

So yes, soaking up the urine before mopping helps quite a bit, using an enzyme based cleaner or adding vinegar to your mop water also helps but really the solution here is to ask your roommate to get his dogs house trained since no matter the amount or type of cleaning, constant peeing on your floor will ruin them.

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answered 2017-07-21 20:22:29 -0600

im confused on what your bigger concern here. Is it that your dog is peeing in the house where she wasn't before? Or are you looking for reasons to build a case for your friend to use a different mop? It seems to me like that's the bigger concern here.

If it's the latter, I don't think marking is very convincing. To your point about the dog marking it's scent because of where the mop is being used- If that was the case your dog would be trying to pee on the mop itself, or in other areas around the house where messes are made. If your dog was marking, it would mark different things it "owns"(probably things belonging to you or new items brought into the house) and not just that one spot.

Look for patterns in the accidents and when they occur. If my dog has an accident while I'm not home, he also goes in front of the door. I figure it's because that's the closest spot to being "out". I'll admit those times are when I've left in a hurry without making sure he properly did his business outside, but if you're doing your due dillegence with potty breaks, consider contacting a vet about bladder issues. Maybe your dog can't hold it and waits infront of the door to be let out until an accident happens.

As for the mop situation, just explain to your friend that it's unsanitary and damaging your floors. Show them how you prefer messes to be clean. If they're a respectful roommate they'll understand.

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