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Having a second job?

asked 2015-03-14 22:11:51 -0500

I was thinking about becoming a sitter, but can I have a regular job too? I work at an animal hospital with the hours 7am-3pm. So I would feed, give water, and take on a walk in the early morning, then leave and my roommate would walk the dog(s) at noon and then I would be home at 3pm to hang out with them the rest of the evening. Does that sound okay or is this a solo job? Or does it depend on the owner? Also, if my roommate is helping with the care should I put him on my profile too?

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You can do that BUT you should leave the dog in your house unattended if they have anxiety, if they don't they might need medicine at a specific time and if they're normal kind of dogs they always bark if you're not home. So maybe schedule the dog sitting days when you have a day(s) off .

Hector G.'s profile image Hector G.  ( 2017-02-23 16:01:12 -0500 ) edit

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answered 2015-03-15 00:44:18 -0500

To all of the above: yes.

Does that sound okay or is this a solo job? Or does it depend on the owner?

I work full time at my main job and my partner is a full time student, and we still host Rover dogs usually 1-2 weeks out of the month. I work three 12 hour shifts per week while my partner is in class M-F for a few hours each day. In any given week there are 1-2 days where we will both be gone for a few hours at a time. For us, unless it's a dog we know and who is comfortable with us, we just avoid taking a new dog on a day where we'll both be out of the house, because we want to give them plenty of time to settle in and get used to us, our home and our dogs before leaving. I do this by marking my work days off on the calendar, and I let our clients know what our schedules are like before booking so they know how much time we'll be spending with their dogs. Many of our clients have dogs who are often home during the day while they are at work, and they're fine with us being out of the house for a few hours.

Also, if my roommate is helping with the care should I put him on my profile too?

Yeah, that's a good idea. Generally clients should be aware of and have the chance to meet anyone who will be providing care. Some dogs may be reactive to different types of people; many dogs are afraid of men, or men with beards, or people with hats/hoods, so having everyone who will be caring for the dog present for the meet and greet whenever possible can help prepare you for any weird scenarios that may occur during the stay. That said, coordinating everyone's schedules for a M&G can be difficult, so at the very least make sure he's credited in your profile and make your clients aware of the role he will play, and ask clients if their dog has a problem with any particular kind of person.

Your situation may not make you the best match for some dogs, but I assure you there are plenty of people out there who will be happy with your arrangement.

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thank you so much! that was a REALLY helpful answer!

Erin S.'s profile image Erin S.  ( 2015-03-15 14:15:07 -0500 ) edit
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answered 2017-02-23 15:53:11 -0500

I work full time and am a Rover sitter. Just be upfront with your potential clients. If they don't think that it's a good fit and they prefer someone that is home all day then they will find another sitter. They'll appreciate your honesty and maybe book you for a weekend sitting job when you'll be home!

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answered 2017-02-23 15:29:16 -0500

I work full time and do Rover, but I am very transparent with the owner during the initial contact about the hours I work and how long the dog will be alone during the day. I also ask a lot of questions about separation anxiety and barking.

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answered 2017-02-23 15:25:12 -0500

Please note that your Rover bonding and insurance does not authorize any other persons to provide care for your pet guests. In the unlikely event that something may happen to your pet guest or your roomate, you may be held liable. That risk is up to you.

Marie S., M.S.Ed

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