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Is sugar-free gum more toxic to dogs than chocolate?

asked 2014-09-19 13:32:36 -0500

Everybody knows that chocolate is poisonous to dogs, but I've heard that sugar-free gum is even more toxic. I was told that a dog can eat a little bit of chocolate and be okay, but that a little bit of sugar-free gum will kill them within 20 minutes. Is that true?

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7 Answers

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answered 2014-09-24 15:02:23 -0500

http://www.snopes.com/critters/crusad... TRUE! Xylitol is very dangerous for dogs!

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answered 2014-09-24 12:53:18 -0500

That sounds like a www.Snopes.com question.

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answered 2015-08-28 17:55:38 -0500

I'm a licensed vet, and the answer is a resounding YES. The xylitol in just a few pieces of sugar free gum can cause liver failure in a 40 pound plus dog. I have lost two dogs to xylitol and treated many others. Most of the time, it only causes low blood sugar, but when the liver is targeted, then most dogs will need to be transferred to a 24 hour specialty hospital, and the odds are not good.

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answered 2014-09-24 12:35:36 -0500

Never did hear that.

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answered 2015-08-28 11:18:35 -0500

Chocolate, grapes, raisins, "GUM" of any kind, onions, caffeine, etc. Check out more information on pinterest (free to sign up) Know what is within reach of your dogs for their safety. Found on theodysseyonline.com

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answered 2014-11-19 22:49:53 -0500

Xylitol, a common sweetener in sugar-free gum,s is TOXIC! It can cause liver failure, depending on how much was ingested and the individual dog.

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answered 2015-08-28 18:07:42 -0500

Like with all toxic substances, it depends on the size of the dog and the amount they ingest. Xylitol is highly toxic even at the doses found in some sugar free gum/candy. Baking chocolate has a much higher concentration of the toxic components (theobromine and caffeine) than does dark chocolate, semi-sweet, or milk chocolate. And of course there are individual differences between how much of any one toxin a particular dog's liver and kidneys can handle. My 30 lb dog ate a half pound bag of semi-sweet chocolate chips when a careless visitor put a bag of groceries down on the floor in my kitchen and didn't put them away before leaving. She vomited once and then was fine. Another dog her size may not have been so lucky. So it goes with any toxic substance, so it's best to avoid all exposure rather than risk it.

This is a convenient chart to put up somewhere visible to remind yourself (and others in your household) what to be aware of:

Most common toxins to dogs

(I will point out, mushrooms doesn't refer to the common culinary mushrooms: white/button/crimini/portobello.)

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