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Do English Bulldog puppies take longer than other breeds to house train?

asked 2015-08-27 19:02:07 -0500

One of the dogs I am watching at their house is a male 5-month old English Bulldog. He recently came from the breeder. Since I'm unfamiliar with this breed, I did some research before my first visit with them, so I would know the basics on the breed. This is becoming a reoccurring long term position with this family. I am just curious, at about what age do English Bulldogs "get it"? Other breeds I have experienced were house trained by 5-6 months. English Bulldogs are very affectionate, but seem to be stubborn.
Any information about English Bulldog puppies would be appreciated.

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It might be just this pup. Maybe he knows he is the baby of the house and he gets away with it. Training is something that has to be consistent from anyone caring for the dog. If you allow bad behavior one day and not the next, it won't work. Consistency is key.

Anibel S.'s profile image Anibel S.  ( 2015-08-31 00:38:10 -0500 ) edit

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answered 2015-08-28 22:24:04 -0500

I knew an English Bulldog breeder a long time ago, and I don't remember her mentioning anything about the breed having housetraining difficulties. I heart more about their tendencies towards obsessiveness and their difficulties using their nose.

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answered 2015-11-05 15:39:22 -0500

Ive had two bullies, neither were super difficult to train but needed different methods, although one has one spot in the house I haven't been able to break him of. My first was an "only child" so he didn't have another dog around to learn from. I used bring him to the bathroom with me and sit him on the puppy pad so every time I went, he did to, Id just say "go pee pee" and "good pee pee" with a puppy party if he was successful, it worked pretty well! . After he was trained on the pad I moved the pad closer to the front door then finally to outside, all with the same "go pee pee" "good pee pee" and puppy party, which by the time he was fully trained he loved a good puppy party and I did his whole life, he'd always be excited to pee/ poopy, lol . For my second, we did the same but he really learned more from his brother, and we moved into out house by then also so was easier to take him out back. Although as the sitter and only occasional presence I don't know how affective you'd be, the owners would really need to be super consistant with him and you'd just have to reinforce there methods or he'd get confused.

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answered 2015-10-27 12:42:19 -0500

We got our English Bulldogs at 8 weeks old and I had her trained within a month. She was perfect with the bathroom and crate-training worked really well. We made sure not to use it as punishment though - that is key. Within a month, she had associated it as her safe place. After another month or so, we left her in one room by herself when we went out and then the first floor of the house and she did fine. It's really dependent on owners.

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answered 2015-10-15 11:19:12 -0500

I have an Old English bulldog. His first family did not take the time to housetrain him, They were honest with me & let me know that they simply weren't consistent with him. He was 9 months old when I got him. He didn't take too long to train, but I made sure I was consistent with him. I always told him it was potty time, so he could identify with a key word. I do have other dogs & I think that helps as well. Monkey see, monkey do. I think the key is consistency. I basically had him trained over a 3 day labor day weekend.

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answered 2015-08-27 21:47:42 -0500

I'm not aware of English Bulldogs taking longer to housetrain. It might be this individual dog wasn't housetrained well enough by the breeder. I think the best thing to do is start back at square one. That means to not let the dog have free reign in the house (keep confined to a crate, utility room, kitchen, or similar) and take the dog out frequently to relieve himself. When he does go to the bathroom outside, praise him. Use an odor neutralizer on spots where he has gone in the house, so he won't think it's okay to go potty there. The key is consistency and supervision.

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