0

Why is my dog pooping in her crate?

asked 2018-09-07 19:22:56 -0500

My puppy is 9 weeks old so I get that she’s very young, however I have read over and over again that the best way to potty train a dachshund is by crate training. The idea is that dogs don’t like to go in the places they sleep so they hold it. That is not even remotely happening with our pup.

Here is the schedule: Boyfriend goes to bed at 11pm. He takes her out before lights out. I get up at 1am and take her out. He gets up at 3 am to take her out. Finally at 5am I get up for the day and take her out.

She is very young so we were recommended to take her out every two hours or more. However, almost immediately after putting her in her crate throughout the night, she pees or poops in the crate. Like immediately after we put her in there. We’re still locking the crate and she’s doing her business in there while we watch in horror! And we will have JUST taken her out. We are starting to think she is doing it on purpose because she wants to be with us and hates the crate.

During the day if we leave the crate open she will go in and out of it and even lay down in it and take a quick nap, and we have tried feeding her in there as well as putting toys in there, though we have stopped putting her toys in there because she is pooping on them!

We know this is the hardest part and we just need to get through it, but this is happening multiple times a night and she’s so small... how can she have so much poop to do this much damage! We’re hoping someone who has been through similar can give us a nugget of wisdom to get us through. Does it just take consistency and time or are we doing something wrong?? Help!!

edit edit tags flag offensive close merge delete

Comments

It may be that your dogs needs a slightly longer walk untill it has done a poo. Also when jut starting walk , if the dogs stops to pee,say ' Good potty or good pee and reward with a pet or a small treat. After awhile, reduce treats but continue verbal reinforcement, with a treat at the end.

Mildred T.'s profile image Mildred T.  ( 2019-04-17 21:02:56 -0500 ) edit

First off I disagree with crate training and potty training going together. She is associating the crate with going potty and thinks that's what she's suppose to do. Why only crate at night? And how did you start it out? Did you slowly go up to 2 hours or expect her to be ok with it from the start?

Candy H.'s profile image Candy H.  ( 2019-05-11 16:58:44 -0500 ) edit

5 Answers

Sort by » oldest newest most voted
1 2 next »
2
answered 2019-05-28 05:46:39 -0500

This ultimately cannot be answered without further detail...When you take her out to potty, are you confirming what she's specifically doing in order to know what might be to come? Does she have a solid feeding schedule, or is food left out for her when she's out (or left in the crate)? How big is the crate, compared to her? Those details could help us to answer your question with more specifics. Thanks!

edit flag offensive delete link more

Comments

This post was created September of last year, and, *hopefully* this is no longer an issue! :D

Cindy & Stephen G.'s profile image Cindy & Stephen G.  ( 2019-05-29 21:18:19 -0500 ) edit

Crate is likely too big. But I trained a yorkie to use weewee pads by getting him a giant crate and put the weewee pads down at one end, put a bed and water at other end. It worked great. He goes wherever his weewee pad is now.

Annemarie B.'s profile image Annemarie B.  ( 2019-08-18 03:19:26 -0500 ) edit
2
answered 2019-05-09 17:41:26 -0500

My dog did this as well when I first got him; (he was 2 years old but had never been potty-trained). The problem for us was that the crate he was in was too big. He needed to be in a crate where he can stand up and turn around, but not much more than that. You issue may be a combination of things; (age of dog, size of crate, etc.)

edit flag offensive delete link more
1
answered 2018-09-07 22:14:13 -0500

Start feeding your pup in the crate, most won't pee and poop where they eat. And at 9 weeks old you cannot expect a dog to be house trained it will probably take a few months. Best of luck

edit flag offensive delete link more
0
answered 2019-04-16 20:57:15 -0500

Usually this happens when the crate is too big. They only need space enough to lie down not move around too much, it's a sleeping place or a hang out, not a social place. Start paying attention to your dog more. Usually they will sniff and do a little "dance" of some sort before going potty. You might not be taking her out long enough.

They also tend to pee/poo right after eating so try that. Feed, wait a bit, then take her out...when you see whatever their dance looks like (some lift a tail more, some droop it, some spin around while sniffing... just watch, you'll see what I mean) get ready with a treat in your hand. As soon as she pees or poops, even if it's a DROP, say "go potty!" and then pretend you're having the biggest party every. Say gooooooddd girl!! Basically she won the lotto. Give her a treat. This treat she ONLY gets when she potty's, nowhere and no time else.

Dogs are smart and most are food motivated and most REALLY love it when you throw a party. If she messes up, just clean up the mess, don't say a word, not a sound, nothing. But when they do good, throw a party. Trust me, it works. :D

edit flag offensive delete link more
0
answered 2019-06-03 02:16:48 -0500

They also tend to do this if the crate is too large for their size - tough when they’re puppies and you know they’re going to grow, so you want to accommodate they’re adult size. However, they’ll designate “areas” of the crate to food, sleep, poop if adequate space allows! Along with what the other commenters said!

edit flag offensive delete link more
0
answered 2019-05-28 21:19:10 -0500

Small breeds (like Dachshunds) in particular have a lot of trouble with potty training. My dog Rosie was a full-breed Chihuahua and would also pee or sometimes poop in her crate, especially when she felt threatened or she was overly excited. It was because she was a puppy-mill momma. Your dog is probably having a different problem - she either isn't getting outside enough, or she isn't getting outside at the right time.

Take your dog out to do her business every time she eats or drinks. Praise her lavishly when she goes outside and poops or pees (treats are helpful - meat is preferable, but if you can get your dog to eat something with fiber, apple is a good thing too, it will help them digest their food easier and get it through to the back end, so to speak). And if there is a favorite place that she likes to go (carpet, blankets, etc.) start by cleaning the offending item with nature's miracle pet stain and odor remover, but if that can't be done (or it doesn't help any) just try limiting the places she can move around in. Baby gates are invaluable for this, especially when it comes to carpet.

Hope this helps!

edit flag offensive delete link more
0
answered 2019-05-24 09:44:12 -0500

It is true that dogs in general don't like to poop where they sleep & eat, so i will recommend first is to keep working the same way, don't stop the crate training, but one of the most fundamental factors in putty training a dog is the understanding of the dog for the correct area where to do it. So i will suggest to focus on rewarding the dog when it pees & poos outside & make sure to not reprehend it when it does it inside, because that is letting the dog understand that you will be upset & is a way to upset you, also try to leave the crate dirty for 1 or 2 days as well, so the dog will have to deal with the smell for a longer period of time

I hope this can help

edit flag offensive delete link more
0
answered 2019-05-01 18:56:18 -0500

Could be a few things going on here. 1st The size of the crate makes a huge difference. The crate should be just large enough for the dog to lie down, stand up and turn around. Should not have a lot of room. Especially not large enough for several toys. When its too large the dog will poop and pee in there. The smaller size is not mean. Its needed especially when traveling as it protects the pup from injury should you have an accident. 2nd If its diarrhea see the vet. The pup could have worms or an infection making it difficult to control body functions. 3rd could be place oriented. Maybe the dog associated the existing crate with a place to go potty. Id recommend you look at a new, smaller crate. As changing the behavior at this point will be frustrating. Start new. 4th. The pup is still young so accidents will happen. They will get less frequent. The little guy does not need a lot of toys in there when he is in the crate especially at this young age. Later can put in chew bone. For now not a lot of stuff.

edit flag offensive delete link more
0
answered 2019-05-08 18:15:26 -0500

Sometimes if the crate is too big for the size of the dog they will also use it as a toilet. At this point your pup is also very young, so give it some time and it may resolve. Remember to give lots of praise for pottying outdoors, maybe even a small treat initially. I recommend asking your vet for advice when you get the booster vaccines.

edit flag offensive delete link more
0
answered 2019-05-09 18:30:11 -0500

A dog that young will usually poop about 20 min after eating. I would take the poop out of the crate and set it in a spot in your yard where you want them to go, then praise your pup for going. I would also stay out longer with them so they have a chance to go pee and poop.

edit flag offensive delete link more
1 2 next »

Your Answer

Please start posting anonymously - your entry will be published after you log in or create a new account. This space is reserved only for answers. If you would like to engage in a discussion, please instead post a comment under the question or an answer that you would like to discuss

Add Answer