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My three month old puppy has separation anxiety. Any tips?

asked 2015-12-03 14:46:58 -0600

He is 3 1/2 months old. I rescued him and his previous care taker made no effort to train him. He is blind in one eye. He is so well behaved when I am home, but when I am gone he cries and goes to the bathroom in his cage. I recently started feeding him in his cage so he will associate the cage with the "dining room" rather than the "bathroom" and removed his blanket, since he seemed to be hiding his mess underneath it. I just began doing this yesterday. The only difference is he does not step on his mess as much.

Has anyone had issues similar to this? Tips and feedback would be GREATLY appreciated.

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answered 2015-12-03 16:19:24 -0600

Separation anxiety is not an uncommon thing we see. Some tips are to make sure you are not making a big deal out of leaving. Basically, just leave. Don't say in your cute voice, you will be ok, mommy will miss you, etc. You may be telling him his behavior is ok.
Sometimes a distraction toy is also a good technique. For example, my dog has a soccer ball she kicks around the room that drops treats as it rolls. It take her about 20 minutes to get it empty, and she is like a star soccer player lol, and distracts her from the fact I left. Or you can do a Kong filled with peanut butter, etc. They also make calming treats like composure or solliquin that have things like milk proteins that are supposed to help calm them. Not saying they work with everyone, but I have seen them work.
If I think of anything else I will let you know. Good luck!

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answered 2015-12-03 14:59:01 -0600

One of my Rover clients has terrible anxiety. When I visit her, she either shakes uncontrollably and pees or lays on the couch and it takes a lot to get her up to go outside. I have found that an essential oil called Peace & Calming from the brand Young Living completely changes her behaviors. I wear the oil on my wrists and neck when I visit her and I also rub a drop on the pads of her feet. If you are not familiar with essential oils, there are tons of uses for them and tons of testimonials online about their benefits.

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Sometimes oils can be a great help, as mentioned, just use caution. Some oils are safe to use with pets, and other can make the, very sick. Research before you use. Each oil is different. Some are perfectly safe, some have restrictions to how they are used, and others simply are not safe.

Freya M.'s profile image Freya M.  ( 2015-12-03 15:08:33 -0600 ) edit
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answered 2015-12-03 14:53:18 -0600

Silly question, but when wondering how you know how the pup is behaving when no one is home, since obviously you're not there? You said he cries. Any idea for how long after you leave? A min, 20 mins, the entire time, more or less, etc. Also, how long at a time is he usually alone/crated, and how often? With regard to the messes in the crate, how often does he eat, how many times a day, etc? Do you leave food and water in the crate when you're not home, or just at mealtime when you are home. Sorry for all the questions, but I feel I can't really help unless I have a little more information first.

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Try leaving something with your scent on it with him when you leave and tell him exactly what's going on. They will listen to your positive tone and feel better.

Barbara L.'s profile image Barbara L.  ( 2015-12-04 16:03:31 -0600 ) edit
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answered 2015-12-03 16:55:09 -0600

This link has tips from the Humane Society that might help you. http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/...

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