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What should I do when dogs jumps on me and smells my feet? I'm a stranger to them?

asked 2021-11-09 20:05:34 -0600

I recently started to get over my bad fear for dogs. I met a Husky and a golden retriever near my house but they jump on me when I go near them. They brings back some of my fears. What behaviour should I show to stop the dogs from jumping on me? The female golden retriever subtly tried to bite me when she jumped. Both the dogs were happy as they were wagging their tails but since I'm a stranger, how do I build trust and comfort?

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answered 2021-11-17 19:07:57 -0600

If I am meeting a family for the first time, I let the dog sniff me and do not pay attention for many reasons. I speak to the parents so the dog understands that I am invited and welcomed into the house, and the dog can hear from their parents’ voices that they are happy to see me. Then, while I am speaking to the parents, the dog can take their time sniffing me without feeling pressure or prying eyes with expectations.

When we are ready, we can all turn our attention to the pup and they can get my attention along with their parents.

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answered 2021-11-11 01:48:04 -0600

I like to ask owners if they're comfortable with me bringing a couple treats for introducing myself to their pup during a new booking. If I have any concern, I'll also ask how their pup usually does with first-time greetings and/or ask best practices for my arrival... Attention is the #1 thing to consider, so make sure you use your knees to gently but confidently push them off your body when jumping up. Reward verbally or with treats as their behavior improves. Keep your fingers in and your shoulders back; YOU are the dominate caretaker in the room! Keep a calm, positive tone to announce your arrival and gradually encourage the dog to get closer. At a distance, hold your hand in a fist so they can sniff if they choose. (Dogs use their nose to say hello (aka smelling your feet.) Try not to thrust. your hand or reach above the dogs's head. Don't be afraid to call the owner to confirm you're safe to speed up the experience! Once you're comfortable enough, try patting its side, neck, back, or chest, while continually rewarding as they become more familiar with you. As you bring the leash/harness closer, keep your movements calm and steady, and focus on moving towards completing your service. Hopefully, it will be clear you’ve made a new friend!

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