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What can I do when a dog pees all over my house after owner said they were house broke?

asked 2017-01-29 17:11:43 -0500

On all the Rover questions they were asked came up "maybe", and then told me when I asked about it.... that they didn't fill that part out but that their dog was house trained, liked kids, got along with other dogs and cats. This dog peed all over my house and I didn't really notice for a couple/few days when I noticed wet spots on the carpet when I stepped on it with just socks on. I check with a black light and a moisture probe only to find 22 spots where urine was and still had moisture in them. No doubt I will have to get my carpets cleaned...at least the walkways where all the pee was.......can I charge them, or am I just screwed and have to take what I made on this sitting to alleviate the urine stains....and most likely the smell to come?

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7 Answers

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answered 2017-01-29 20:37:05 -0500

Hi, Mark! While you can always mention this to the owners, it is important to note that not all dogs will behave in your home as they do in theirs. It is always possible that the owners may have fibbed, but also possible that the dog was unsure how to ask to go outside or urinated more frequently due to nerves, for example. Based on the number of times, and depending on how long their stay was, it almost sounds like they may have had a UTI with that frequency of urination! It may come off as passive aggressive to turn around and send the owners a message, rather than having discussed this during their pick-up. They are not by any means responsible or required to reimburse you. I wouldn't say that you're "screwed" either, it's just comes with the territory of opening your home to other's pets! If you do end up having your carpets cleaned or purchasing carpet cleaner for yourself, you can always claim that on your taxes as a business expense. For the future, perhaps take them out for longer potty breaks/walks to ensure that they empty their bladder, or, with the owner's permission, you could try a belly band if it was a male dog and you think it is more related to marking.

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answered 2017-02-03 23:39:55 -0500

I feel your pain. My carpet is destroyed since I started Rover. I own a carpet cleaner and now I just automatically clean my carpets once a month, more if necessary. It's what's known as COB: Cost of (doing) Business.

Some people lie and some dogs can't handle a new environment. Take notes so if you get another request from the same Owner you can either turn it down or be prepared for the next visit: Keep the dog in a tiled area, let them out/walk them as often as humanly possible and last but not least... get after those wet spots ASAP. I've discovered after much trial and error that the best defense is a quick response. I have yet to find a product that gets rid of the stains 100%, they always seem to come back ever so slightly and slowly after a few days.

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answered 2017-02-04 09:50:13 -0500

I take the dogs out when they first come. New pups may pee due to nervousness - new environment for first time stay/visit and/or some repeats "mark". Then I keep them in my sight. If any show any signs of marking/peeing I get them back outside immediately. That said, accidents happen. I do put down pee pads for a couple little females when they come. One will not go outside to pee if it is raining. She does use the pee pads. I do take the pups for walks which also helps. Once you get to know each pup and they become comfortable in your home, you will come to know what to expect from each.

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I agree 100% with taking them outside right away. I do that especially for Meet & Greets. The dogs just can't seem to contain their excitement about the new environment. So I figure it's up to us humans to help them not make a mistake.

Jill G.'s profile imageJill G. ( 2017-02-04 11:20:25 -0500 )edit
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answered 2017-02-01 14:28:44 -0500

I usually consider new clients that have accidents are due to being in a new environment. I would be patient and clean the spot with baking soda and vinegar. And I agree with the answer above, I would mention it to the owner about the accidents just so they're aware. Is it a puppy? are they neutered? the marking could be a behavior thing too. You can always rent a carpet cleaner from most grocery stores to clean it so you don't have to get done professionally. I take this as a part of the job thing, and I haven't held an owner responsible for payment. ( Plus it might be really hard to get them to pay up ) Hope this helps!

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I've not had good luck with the baking soda/vinegar combo. I really thought it was going to work. I bought a gallon of vinegar and two large boxes of baking soda but the stains came right back. I used this method http://www.instructables.com/id/Year-Old-Carpet-Stains-GONE/ Do you know another way?

Jill G.'s profile imageJill G. ( 2017-02-04 11:16:44 -0500 )edit

Hi Jill! I literally pour the vinegar on the baking soda, and I pour generously. I rub the mix into the carpet and let it sit. I'll come back and look at it in about 30 mins, and might pour more vinegar on the baking soda remnants. In about an hour I'll vacuum the spot. So far I've had luck. :\

Brandie S.'s profile imageBrandie S. ( 2017-03-07 12:23:11 -0500 )edit

All I can say is that Nature's Miracle is just that-a miracle!

Kim L.'s profile imageKim L. ( 2017-05-18 23:12:20 -0500 )edit
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answered 2017-02-05 09:21:36 -0500

Yet another reason I require my guess to be kennel trained. if you're not there you need to confine the dog to a certain area, whether its the kitchen or the kennel. a dog is not responsible for peeing all over the house if you're there with it. you should be monitoring what the dog is doing while you're at home. That's a recipe for disaster. honestly if that's all he did, you got off extremely well. most dogs will destroy and chew property when they are home alone and bored. In addition to property damage, the dog could get into something that could cause it to get ill or injured.

In this particular case no you can't go back to the owner after the dog has left and say oops I just found out a week later that your dog peed. However if you let the dog loose, he caused an accident and when you came back home checked the area: then yes you could ask them for compensation. But in that situation you would send them pictures immediately and say hey I guess Fido isn't having as great a time as I thought etc.

I'm sorry for you but in this case it's one of those live and learn moments.... best of luck for your next client!

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answered 2017-03-08 16:57:27 -0500

Right now I have a pair of dogs here and they are older. The male has been marking periodically all over the house. He is neutered. I believe its just because they are not use to being outside of there home. They are also usually outdoor dogs during the day. However, I also have noticed the urine is on vertical objects, marking. He is neutered. So nothing I can really do except try to manage the situation and keep him off of carpet when I am not able to watch him. Also of course making sure to clean the areas with a high quality enzyme cleaner is best like natures miracle.

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I don't take dogs into my home but when I housse sit, if I take my pup along then I have him wear a bellyband. It's a little maxi-pad like band that wraps around his waist. I buy the non-absorbant kind so he feels like he's peeing on himself, which he hates. It prevents him from trying :)

Moureene T.'s profile imageMoureene T. ( 2017-03-08 17:13:26 -0500 )edit
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answered 2017-03-02 13:24:45 -0500

With no offense, I would hope that as a Pet Sitter, you would not give any pet the opportunity to go inside your house by taking it out frequently to go potty

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If, as you report, the dog peed in your house "22 times" and you did not notice for "several days" .... how much are you actually watching this dog? Dog sitting involves more than just physically having a dog loose somewhere in your house and otherwise ignoring it.

Christina T.'s profile imageChristina T. ( 2017-03-07 07:26:34 -0500 )edit

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